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Cal/OSHA has updated its FAQs on COVID-19 Prevention Emergency Temporary Standards (ETS) to incorporate new guidance from the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) on isolation and quarantine periods.

In December 2020, Governor Newsom issued Executive Order N-84-20, which states that the recommended isolation and quarantine periods in the ETS will be overridden by any CDPH applicable isolation or quarantine recommendation if the ETS periods are longer than those recommended by CDPH.

We will continue to provide further guidance regarding developing HR-related news. Should you have any questions, please contact our office at 916.444.6200, info@hrtogo.com, or your HR Consultant directly.

View original article here: https://www.dir.ca.gov/DIRNews/2022/2022-03.html

HR Hot Topic – Cal/OSHA Updates COVID-19 FAQs to Align with CDPH Guidance on Isolation and Quarantines

Recently the California Division of Occupational Safety and Health (Cal/OSHA) readopted the Emergency Temporary Standards (ETS) for a second time, which includes the latest recommendations from the California Department of Public Health (CDPH). The following changes will take effect on January 14, 2022.

  • COVID-19 in the workplace – Employers are still required to provide notice of COVID-19 in the workplace. This update now includes additional instructions on how to notify workers.
  • COVID-19 Tests – Testing now includes home tests, over-the-counter tests, and point-for-care tests (in addition to viral tests) as long as the test is not self-administered or self-read.
  • Face Coverings – The definition was updated to include more detail on the different types of acceptable face coverings.
  • Quarantine Period – In accordance with CDC guidelines quarantine period recommendation depends on an individual’s vaccination status:
    • For unvaccinated individuals — or those who are more than six months out from their second mRNA dose (or more than two months after the J&J vaccine) and not yet boosted — the CDC now recommends five days’ quarantine followed by strict mask use for an additional five days. Alternatively, if a five-day quarantine isn’t feasible, the CDC states it’s imperative that an exposed person wear a well-fitting mask at all times when around others for 10 days after exposure.
    • Individuals who have received their booster shot don’t need to quarantine after an exposure, but they should wear a mask for 10 days after the exposure.
    • The agency also indicates that a best practice for all individuals exposed is to test for SARS-CoV-2 at day five after exposure and, if symptoms occur, immediately quarantine until a negative test confirms symptoms aren’t attributable to COVID-19.
  • Return to Work Criteria: The period of time before an employee can return to work after close contact or COVID-19 infection has been revised to be consistent with current CDPH guidelines. These time frames will automatically update if CDPH updates their guidelines pursuant to the Governor’s executive order (N-84-20).
  • Outbreak in the Workplace: If three or more people in the workplace test positive, the employer must make testing available to all employees exposed regardless of vaccination and symptom status.

We will continue to provide further guidance regarding developing HR-related news. Should you have any questions, please contact our office at 916.444.6200, info@hrtogo.com, or your HR Consultant directly.

Sources: https://hrwatchdog.calchamber.com/2021/12/cdc-shortens-recommended-isolation-quarantine-periods-for-public-but-employers-must-follow-cal-oshas-covid-19-ets/

https://www.dir.ca.gov/DIRNews/2021/2021-124.html

https://www.fisherphillips.com/news-insights/10-things-employers-calosha-emergency-covid-19-workplace-rules.html

HR Hot Topic – CDC Shortens Recommended Isolation, Quarantine Periods for Public, But Employers Must Follow Cal/OSHA’s COVID-19 ETS

The Occupational Safety and Health Standards Board yesterday adopted revisions to the COVID-19 Prevention Emergency Temporary Standards to include the latest recommendations from the California Department of Public Health. The revisions will take effect on January 14, 2022.
The revisions include the following:

  • Investigating and responding to COVID-19 cases in the workplace: Employers must continue to properly notify employees, employee representatives and any other workers at a worksite of possible COVID-19 exposures within one business day. This section was updated to give employers more clear instructions on how to notify workers who were at the same worksite as the COVID-19 case during the high-risk exposure period.
  • Face Coverings: The definition was updated to include more detail on the different types of acceptable face coverings.
  • Testing and Exclusion: The following revisions make the ETS consistent with current CDPH recommendations:
    • Employers are now required to make COVID-19 testing available at no cost and during paid time to employees who were fully vaccinated before the “close contact” with a COVID-19 case occurred, even if they are asymptomatic.
    • During outbreaks and major outbreaks, employers must now make weekly testing (outbreaks) or twice-weekly testing (major outbreaks) available to asymptomatic fully vaccinated employees in the exposed group.
    • Employees who have recently recovered from COVID-19 and those who are fully vaccinated are not required to be excluded from the workplace after “close contact” but must wear a face covering and maintain six feet of physical distancing for 14 calendar days following the last date of contact.
  • Return to Work Criteria: The period of time before an employee can return to work after close contact or COVID-19 infection has been revised to be consistent with current CDPH guidelines. These time frames will automatically update if CDPH updates their guidelines pursuant to the Governor’s executive order (N-84-20).

Important requirements remain unchanged in the COVID-19 Prevention Emergency Temporary Standards. Employers must continue to maintain an effective COVID-19 Prevention Program that includes identifying and evaluating employee exposures to COVID-19 health hazards, training employees on how to prevent hazards and implementing procedures to correct unsafe conditions. Employers should still allow adequate time for handwashing and cleaning frequently touched surfaces and objects.

We will continue to provide further guidance regarding developing HR-related news. Should you have any questions, please contact our office at 916.444.6200, info@hrtogo.com, or your HR Consultant directly.

View original article here: https://www.dir.ca.gov/DIRNews/2021/2021-124.html

HR Hot Topic – Occupational Safety & Health Standards Board Votes to Adopt Revised COVID-19 Prevention Emergency Temporary Standards

As employers gear up for the new laws that take effect January 1, 2022, they can’t forget about the ever-increased minimum wage rates that occur every January 1. In California, there are two different statewide minimum wage rates, depending upon employer size. Effective January 1, 2022, the minimum wage rate for employers with 26 or more employees will increase to $15 per hour while the minimum wage rate for employers with 25 or fewer employees will increase to $14 per hour.

Also, don’t forget that the salary threshold for the administrative, executive, and professional exemptions is two times the applicable statewide minimum wage. So, if you’re paying your exempt employees the minimum salary required to maintain the exemption, you’ll need to ensure those employees also receive an increase on January 1. In 2022, the minimum exempt salary will be $62,400 for employers with 26 or more employees and $58,240 for employers with 25 or fewer employees.

Lastly, over the last several years, many local governments have implemented their own minimum wage rates for work performed within their jurisdiction. West Hollywood is the latest city to do so, enacting their own minimum wage ordinance (MWO) that takes effect January 1, 2022. The West Hollywood MWO sets minimum wage rates depending on the size of the employer’s workforce. 

Below is a list of local minimum wages per hour that will increase effective January 1, including the newly-enacted West Hollywood MWO.

  • Belmont: $16.20
  • Burlingame: $15.60
  • Cupertino: $16.40
  • Daly City: $15.53
  • East Palo Alto: $15.60
  • El Cerrito: $16.37
  • Half Moon Bay: $15.56
  • Hayward: $15.56 for employers with 26 or more employees; $14.52 for employers with 25 or fewer employees
  • Los Altos: $16.40
  • Menlo Park: $15.75
  • Mountain View: $17.10
  • Novato: $15.77 for employers with 100 or more employees; $15.53 for employers with 26 to 99 employees; $15.00 for employers with 25 or fewer employees
  • Oakland: $15.06
  • Palo Alto: $16.45
  • Petaluma: $15.85
  • Redwood City: $16.20
  • Richmond: $15.54
  • San Carlos: $15.77
  • San Diego: $15
  • San Jose: $16.20
  • San Mateo: $16.20
  • Santa Clara: $16.40
  • Santa Rosa: $15.85
  • Sonoma: $16 for employers with 26 or more employees; $15 for employers with 25 or fewer employees
  • South San Francisco: $15.80
  • Sunnyvale: $17.10
  • West Hollywood:$15.50 for employers with 26 or more employees; $15 for employers with 25 or fewer employees

Each minimum wage ordinance also has notice and posting requirements, and with the new increases come new 2022 posters that must be displayed in workplaces subject to the local ordinances (the city in which your employees work — whether at your facilities, remotely from their homes or while traveling — determines which required local ordinances posters apply to your business).

We will continue to provide further guidance regarding developing HR-related news. Should you have any questions, please contact our office at 916.444.6200, info@hrtogo.com, or your HR Consultant directly.

View original article here: https://hrwatchdog.calchamber.com/2021/12/minimum-wage-increases-coming-january-1/

HR Hot Topic – Minimum Wage Increases Coming January 1

Employers could see this coming, and now they say it’s hard to imagine how long it will last.

U.S. labor costs in Q3 2021 increased by the biggest margin since 2001 as companies boosted wages and benefits amid a severe worker shortage, suggesting inflation could remain high for some time.

The Employment Cost Index (ECI), the broadest measure of labor costs, surged 1.3 percent in Q3 2021 after rising 0.7 percent in the quarter before, the Labor Department said in October. It marked the largest gain in 20 years.

Labor costs powered ahead 3.7 percent on a year-over-year basis, the largest rise since the fourth quarter of 2004.

The ECI is widely viewed by policymakers and economists as one of the better measures of labor market slack and is seen as a predictor of core inflation because it adjusts for composition and job quality changes. Economists polled by Reuters had forecast the ECI advancing 0.9 percent in the third quarter.

Wages and salaries soared 1.5 percent after increasing 0.9 percent in the second quarter. They were up 4.2 percent year-over-year. Benefits gained 0.9 percent after rising 0.4 percent in the April-June quarter.

Additionally, U.S. employers were expecting their group health plan premiums to increase, on average, around 5 percent in 2022, even after taking cost-management initiatives into account, according to recent employer surveys by several HR consultancies.

As companies are paying more to recruit and retain workers, they are also struggling to find applicants. The COVID-19 pandemic has upended labor market dynamics, creating an economy-wide acute shortage of workers that nearly all industries are facing.

According to a Gallup study in July, 48 percent of employees are actively looking for their next role and 1 in 4 will find a new role in the next six months.

Meanwhile, the most recent unemployment claims report for the week that ended Nov. 20 noted the lowest number of new claims—199,000—recorded in more than 50 years.

Yet while there is a record low number of people claiming unemployment, there also were 10.4 million job openings at the end of September (1.4 for each employee seeking work), and a record-setting 4.4 million people quit their jobs that month, either leaving the workforce or choosing to work elsewhere.

Switching jobs can pay off: A September study by Zippia Research showed that after switching jobs, salary increases 14.8 percent on average and wage growth rises 5.8 percent.

Workers between the ages of 25 and 34 receive the highest wage increase, at 9.8 percent. The bigger the company, the larger the pay raise: Companies with more than 1,000 employees offer an average pay raise of 6.9 percent.

What Companies Are Doing About It

Leaders at companies facing soaring wage and recruitment expenses say the rate of increases is something they’ve never seen before.

Robert Guy, SHRM-SCP, chief people officer at food packaging manufacturer Darnel Inc. in Monroe, N.C., said hiring costs for his company aren’t boosted by inflation; rather, they are more affected by the lack of available workers and turnover.

“We’ve done what many businesses are doing in response: increase base rates and offering hiring incentives. As a result, the hiring costs have increased dramatically. Our benefits haven’t changed during [the pandemic],” he said. “The fact that inflation is feeling like it is here to stay, this will eventually have a longer-term effect on all things related to employment, from onboarding to retirement.”

Philip Dana, vice president of human resources at Dendreon Pharmaceuticals, which is headquartered in Seal Beach, Calif., said his company recently added a managed service program to control mark-up costs for supplied talent.

“We also shifted benefits brokers and intend to assess the shift from fully funded benefits to self-funded as well as adding a high-deductible plan in order to manage the soaring health care costs,” Dana said.

Dendreon’s HR team previously had 11 workers, but, given this situation, it added a dedicated senior compensation analyst to stay on top of Fair Labor Standards Act compliance and compensation data. In the next 12 months, the company plans to add more than 150 new hires to its current 540-person workforce.

The $100,000 Guarantee

Andrea Bunch, vice president of human resources at JK Moving Services & CapRelo in Sterling, Va., said her companies incorporated alternate work schedules and paid for employees to take sabbaticals while retaining full health care benefits at the employer’s expense.

“We negotiated aggressively with our health care provider and used wellness dollars wisely to prepare employees emotionally, mentally and physically for what was clearly on the horizon,” Bunch said. “We knew that health care costs could pack a punch on employees and our group health and wellness programs.

“Our proactive engagement paid off as we’ve enjoyed consecutive years with no increase and no modification to our plan composition. That translates to savings for the employer and the employees alike.”

On salaries, facing the additional burden of a nationwide driver shortage, CapRelo’s actions included providing an unprecedented $100,000 minimum annual salary guarantee for all active and future over-the-road drivers, giving them financial assurance and stability during and after the pandemic. Reports in November by the Bureau of Labor Statistics estimated that the average long-haul truck-driver’s salary is $64,210.

Stacey Berk, founder and managing consultant at Expand HR Consulting in Rockville, Md., said the ECI is a data point that CEOs, CFOs and CHROs are paying closer attention to in this unique time period.

“The increase is having a direct impact on the cost of turnover and the cost of hiring,” Berk said. “It is also putting pressure on executives to greatly enhance employee benefits [and] internal job growth opportunities and pay-for-performance merit increases for employees. There’s a sense of permanency to partial and full work-from-home arrangements, and adjusting those policies appropriately is important.”

She said it will be a challenge to control costs in this unique labor market because “there’s too much unavoidable competition. We have seen organizations pausing long-term HR or other organizationwide projects, shifting expenditures to meet this demand.”

More Money for Job Ads

For recruiting and employee referral programs, Berk said she is seeing spot bonuses designed to encourage both existing employees and new hires to stick around.

“It’s hard to avoid the expanding job advertising budget per job, regardless,” she said. “Social media outlets, once reserved primarily for organization projects or services, are rebranding job ads throughout the recruiting process to enhance applicant pools.

“To attract better talent, employee benefits, especially mental health offerings, corporate discounts designed for work-from-home employees and wellness programs are key, but require an investment to set up and maintain.”

She said to encourage existing staff to stay, in addition to offering enhanced benefits, CHROs are trying to tweak their approach to how internal opportunities are offered with individual department leadership. “This takes the form of job rotations or other initiatives to reduce burnout. And, pay-for-performance merit increases are a philosophy that’s hard to avoid due to the turnover most employers are facing.”

Ken Reichart, vice president of human resources at Anterra Management Corporation in Dallas, said his hiring costs are rising.

“First, due to the shortage of workers and, second, from rising competition for workers,” he said. “We have seen wage rates edge up, and where an inexpensive or even free job post would draw sufficient resumes, now we end up sponsoring posts and even offering sign-on bonuses for some positions depending on geographic area.”

To help better control costs, Reichart said his company is asking its hiring managers to communicate as soon as they feel they have found a good candidate so it can turn off or pause the job posting.

“Overall, the process takes much more management than before,” Reichart said. 

We will continue to provide further guidance regarding developing HR-related news. Should you have any questions, please contact our office at 916.444.6200, info@hrtogo.com, or your HR Consultant directly.

View original article here: https://www.shrm.org/ResourcesAndTools/hr-topics/employee-relations/Pages/Hiring-and-Benefits-Costs-Hit-16-Year-Highs.aspx?_ga=2.6737269.651418751.1638230973-1183610887.1617723919

HR Hot Topic – Hiring and Benefits Costs Hit 16-Year Highs

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration has suspended implementation and enforcement of the Biden administration’s vaccine mandate for private employers after a federal court blocked the measure.

The current Cal/OSHA COVID-19 Prevention ETS remains in effect, and documents related to it can be found on the OSHSB website: https://www.dir.ca.gov/OSHSB/COVID-19-Prevention-Emergency.html

We will continue to provide further guidance regarding developing HR-related news. Should you have any questions, please contact our office at 916.444.6200, info@hrtogo.com, or your HR Consultant directly.

Additional information about the suspended COVID-19 Vaccination and Testing ETS can be found here: https://www.osha.gov/coronavirus/ets2

HR Hot Topic – Latest News Regarding Vaccine Mandate!

Citing potential “grave statutory and constitutional issues” with the mandate-or-test emergency vaccine rule unveiled by OSHA on Thursday, a federal appeals court just issued an order blocking the ETS from taking effect on a nationwide basis. That the ETS faced immediate litigation from opponents and was at least temporarily sidelined should come as little surprise.

The bigger question left in the wake of Saturday’s legal order: what should employers do now?

What Happened?

As every employer should know by now, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) published a mandate-or-test Emergency Temporary Standard (ETS) late last week which will soon require all covered employers with 100 or more employees to either mandate their workforce receive the vaccination against COVID-19 or test them weekly to ensure they are not infected. 

Here’s an overview of the ETS

On Friday, a number of parties – including a management company, multiple supermarkets, and several individuals – filed suit in the Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit challenging OSHA’s ETS the day it came into effect. 

The Fifth Circuit petition asked the Court to find the ETS either exceeded the scope of OSHA’s authority or that it was unconstitutional. The challengers also pleaded with the Fifth Circuit to “stay” – or temporarily stop – enforcement of the ETS until it could be reviewed by the courts. 

Within 24 hours, the Fifth Circuit issued a brief order staying the ETS until it could be fully reviewed by the Court. The order was extremely terse, stating that “the petitions give cause to believe there are grave statutory and constitutional issues” with the ETS (perhaps purposefully mimicking the claim by OSHA that “grave” danger exists such to justify the emergency rule). 

What’s Next?

We will probably see further rulings in the coming days and weeks from other federal appeals courts as well, some following in the Fifth Circuit’s footsteps and blocking the ETS, others ruling that the ETS stands on solid legal footing. With a patchwork of various legal rulings expected, there will ultimately be a unifying judicial order having the final say on this matter. Whether that ruling comes from the multidistrict litigation panel (an assembly of federal judges that manages certain kinds of national litigation spanning several jurisdictions) or the U.S. Supreme Court remains to be seen.

Where Does This Leave Employers?

At the moment, the outcome of the OSHA ETS is uncertain. While OSHA must refrain from enforcing the ETS until the Fifth Circuit says otherwise, this could change in the blink of an eye if a full panel of appeals court judges removes the stay. And again, with several separate lawsuits filed in different courts challenging the ETS, it is likely that a final binding and unifying determination will not be made for weeks or even months.

What Should You Do?

As of right now, an employer’s best course of action is to familiarize yourself with the requirements of the OSHA ETS and prepare to implement those requirements if the stay is lifted and the emergency rule is revived. After all, OSHA will most likely have little patience with non-compliant employers who claim they held off implementing the mandate-or-test rule while awaiting a final court ruling – and the agency has significant weapons at its disposal in the form of citations and penalties for those not following the ETS edicts.   

We advise employers to spend the coming weeks preparing for the ETS as if it will take effect but waiting to implement its measures until the final judicial outcome is certain. The earliest effective date for any of the ETS requirements is December 5, which includes the need for you to have a vaccination policy and various other technical standards in place. You will be hard pressed to develop these materials overnight, so spend this interim limbo time efficiently and be prepared to comply should the ETS ultimately be upheld. 

We will continue to provide further guidance regarding developing HR-related news. Should you have any questions, please contact our office at 916.444.6200, info@hrtogo.com, or your HR Consultant directly.

View original article here: https://www.fisherphillips.com/news-insights/federal-appeals-court-blocks-oshas-mandate-or-test-emergency-vaccine-rule-what-does-this-mean-for-employers.html

HR Hot Topic – Federal Appeals Court Blocks OSHA’s Mandate-or-Test Emergency Vaccine Rule: What Does This Mean for Employers?

The Occupational Safety and Hazard Administration (OSHA) has revealed its preliminary Top 10 most frequently cited workplace violations for the agency’s fiscal 2021.

Once again, citations related to falls lead the way!

Although the number of total citations had another considerable drop from a year earlier, OSHA citations related to falls was still far and away the biggest source of violations.

Fall Protection – General Requirements, led the way in 2021 for the 11th straight year, with its 5,295 violations more than double that of No. 2, at 2,427 violations.

Ladders was the third most cited violation of 2021 with 2,206, followed by Scaffolding (2,026).

Hazard Communication (1,947) to round out the top five. Hazard Communication was No. 2 in 2020, but its citations fell by 39 percent.

Respiratory protection moved up one spot from 2020 despite 4.6 percent fewer citations. 

Lockout/Tagout repeated at No. 6 with 1,698 citations; Fall ProtectionTraining Requirements moved up one spot to No. 7 (1,666); Personal Protective and Lifesaving Equipment – Eye and Face Protection also moved up a spot to No. 8 (1,452); Powered Industrial Trucks fell two spots to No. 9 (1,420) and Machine Guarding repeated at No. 10 with 1,113 citations.
 
As mentioned previously, citations were down across the board. OSHA reported a preliminary figure of 21,090 for 2021, which is down 13.0 percent from 2020 and down a whopping 33.5 percent from 2019.

To avoid citations and becoming part of the yearly statistic, companies should pay close attention to their safety policies and the day-to-day practices of their employees.

We will continue to provide further guidance regarding developing HR-related news. Should you have any questions, please contact our office at 916.444.6200, info@hrtogo.com, or your HR Consultant directly.

View original article here: https://www.nsc.org/newsroom/osha-reveals-top-10-safety-violations-for-fy-21-at

HR Hot Topic – OSHA Names Top 10 Violations for 2021

The Labor Commissioner’s Office has cited JPI Construction $1.7 million for wage theft violations affecting 265 workers. An investigation found that the San Diego-based company failed to pay workers properly on commercial and residential construction projects, resulting in minimum wage and overtime violations.

The Labor Commissioner’s Office opened an investigation in March 2019 after receiving a report of labor law violations indicating JPI Construction workers were experiencing wage theft because they were only paid for 40 hours a week despite consistently working overtime on mixed-use construction projects in the San Diego and Los Angeles areas.

The investigation found that from April 2018 to March 2019, employees doing framing and sheetrock work were paid a flat rate that did not include overtime. This resulted in frequent minimum wage and overtime violations. Investigators interviewed workers and audited the employer’s payroll records to identify violations. The audit uncovered illegally modified timesheets that removed record of the overtime hours the workers should have been paid.

“Paying workers a flat rate is not an excuse to deny them the overtime hours they earned and should be paid,” said California Labor Commissioner Lilia García-Brower. “The laws in California protect workers. It is critical that workers keep track of their hours and pay so they can defend themselves.”

The citations total $1,771,133, with $1,610,527 payable to the workers. The amount owed to workers includes minimum wage and overtime, waiting time penalties for failure to provide full pay on time, and liquidated damages and interest payable to workers for failure to pay minimum wage for all hours worked. The citations include $143,200 in civil penalties payable to the state.

The owners have appealed the citations. Under the appeal procedure, the Labor Commissioner’s Office will hold a hearing before a hearing officer who will affirm, modify or dismiss the citations.

The labor law violations were reported by Carpenters/Contractors Cooperation Committee, a non-profit labor-management organization.

When workers are paid less than minimum wage, they are entitled to liquidated damages that equal the amount of underpaid minimum wages plus interest. Waiting time penalties are imposed when the employer intentionally fails to pay all wages due to the employee at the time of separation. This penalty is calculated by taking the employee’s daily rate of pay and multiplying it by the number of days the employee was not paid, up to a maximum of 30 days.

We will continue to provide further guidance regarding developing HR-related news. Should you have any questions, please contact our office at 916.444.6200, info@hrtogo.com, or your HR Consultant directly.

View original article here: https://www.dir.ca.gov/DIRNews/2021/2021-104.html

HR Hot Topic – California Labor Commissioner Cites Construction Company $1.7 Million for Wage Theft Violations

On Sept. 27, Gov. Gavin Newsom signed into law SB 606, which expands enforcement power for the California Division of Occupational Safety and Health (which is known as Cal/OSHA). We’ve gathered articles on the news from SHRM Online and other outlets.

Substantial Changes

The new law, which is expected to take effect on Jan. 1, 2022, creates a rebuttable presumption that employers with multiple worksites have made enterprise-wide workplace safety violations in certain circumstances. An employer with a violation at one worksite may be presumed to have similar violations at other worksites. The law also will allow Cal/OSHA to issue a citation to an “egregious” employer for each willful violation. SB 606 will “require each instance of an employee exposed to that violation to be considered a separate violation for purposes of the issuance of fines and penalties,” according to the bill. The bill will also provide Cal/OSHA with additional subpoena power during investigations.

We will continue to provide further guidance regarding developing HR-related news. Should you have any questions, please contact our office at 916.444.6200, info@hrtogo.com, or your HR Consultant directly.

View original article here: https://www.shrm.org/resourcesandtools/legal-and-compliance/state-and-local-updates/pages/newsom-signs-bill-expanding-calosha-enforcement-power.aspx 

HR Hot Topic – Newsom Signs Bill Expanding Cal/OSHA’s Enforcement Power

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